Splitting the present moment

In what we call a ‘moment’ there are millions of micro-moments. Things like our thoughts, husband, wife, concepts, nature are changing at rapid speeds. They look static because our eye and senses are unable to watch these micro-moments.

Developing awareness of what we call the present moment..brings us these micro-moments in sharp attention. For example, first you may first call the present moment to be every second.  It means that you use every second to bring back your attention to the ‘present’ moment. As your ability to concentrate and be ok with ‘what is’, you will be able to break the second into 60 micro-seconds and so on. You will be able to watch and be able to see the changing phenomena will greater intensity and focus.

A kalapa is the minutest particle in the physical plane — still beyond the range of science today. It is only when the eight basic material constituents unite together that the kalapa is formed.  In other words, the momentary collocation of these eight basic elements of behavior makes a man just for that moment, which in Buddhism is known as a kalapa. The life-span of a kalapa is termed a moment, and a trillion such moments are said to elapse during the wink of a man’s eye. These kalapas are all in a state of perpetual change or flux. more

 

Where is my mind? Gautama answers..



Buddha at this time was residing at a large meeting hall set in the ancient forests of India at a place called Sravasti where, with a great congregation of people in attendance, he was addressed by Ananda (his main disciple) with the words – beholds the Buddha.

In the ensuing discourse, sessioned some two and a half thousand years ago, the nature and the location of the mind are discussed:

Read more: http://www.mountainman.com.au/mind.html

Words of Buddha

Buddha’s words after enlightenment

“I have done what it is to be done. I have seen the builder of this house- (indicating his body-but signifying his old self)- “and I have shattered its ridgepole and it’s rafters; that house shall not be built again. I have found the deathless, the unconditioned; I have seen life as it is”

Buddha’s last words before death

ayadhammaa sankhaaraa appamaadena sampaadethaa
all things are perishable, through vigilance Awaken!

Vipassana Reflection #1 – Mind is a drunken monkey

When you do Vipassana, you realize your mind is a monkey when you first starting meditating and try to focus. Very soon, you figure that you are not the master of your mind or sub-conscious. This monkey mind, one that cannot focus and one that jumps from thought to thought is running your body. Once you feed a particular thought, it goes deeper into imaginations on either the past or the future. It is very very fickle.

The mind does not want to live in the present. It wants to derive pleasure or remember the pain from the past or project fear and hope into the future. Unfortunately, the past has passed and future is the child of your present. If you have no control your current thoughts (father of your future child), you are left with a hazy and sad future. This is because, in a moment, the future will become the present and the monkey will lead you off the present–pendulating you between the past and the future. Never still. Never being. Never in the now.

You wonder how each of us, with our fickle minds are able to live everyday given how senselessly, carelessly and insanely our mind handles and organizes thought.

Do you truly live in matter or just live in the fake shadows of your monkey mind? Is this world insane? Do we live in the world that is run by insanity of the minds?